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   Passer domesticus (bird) français   
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         General Impact

    Despite their small size, house sparrows (Passer domesticus) are quite aggressive. House sparrows are known for displacing native species through competition by out-competing them for trophic resources. In rural areas they may evict native birds from their nests. Some species reported as being driven away by P. domesticus include the bluebird and the Carolina wren, as well as a variety of woodpeckers and martins.
    Early in its invasion of North America, P. domesticus began eating ripening grains, such as wheat, oats, corn, barley and sorghum, and was considered a serious agricultural pest. Peas, turnips, cabbage and nearly all young vegetables are also attacked, as well as apples, cherries, grapes, peaches, plums, pears, strawberries and raspberries. Additionally, P. domesticus are a pest on poultry farms where they can consume large quantities of chicken feed.



         Location Specific Impacts:
    Bermuda English 
    Competition: Passer domesticus compete with native bluebirds (Sialia sialis) for nest sites (Dobson, 2003 in Varnham, 2006).
    United States (USA) English 
    Agricultural: According to Aguirre and Poss (2000), early in its invasion of North America, P. domesticus began attacking ripening grains on farmland and was considered a serious agricultural pest. Additionally, P. domesticus is a pest on poultry farms where they can consume fairly large quantities of chicken feed.

    Competition: Passer domesticus may evict native birds from their nests and outcompete them for trophic resources (Aguirre and Poss, 2000). Species reported as driven away by P. domesticus include the bluebird and the Carolina wren, as well as a variety of woodpeckers and martins.



ISSG Landcare Research NBII IUCN University of Auckland