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   Syngonium podophyllum (vine, climber)
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         General Impact

    Syngonium podophyllum can established dense populations that displace surrounding vegetation (Ferriter et al., 2001; Morgan & Overholt, 2005). It has the ability to spread in the deep shade of intact forests, forming a dense mat on the forest floor as well as climbing trees (Space & Flynn, 2001). The stems by which it climbs are thick and fleshy giving them a weight much heavier than most native vines, thus potentially making trees top heavy and more susceptible to toppling in a strong wind (Morgan et al., 2004). It is an abundant FLEPPC category I invasive in Florida where it is known to displace native plants including rare ferns (Possley, 2004; FLEPPC, 2009). In several areas of St. Lucie and Indian River counties of Florida, S. podophyllum has created a thick ground cover that is largely impenetrable to other plants, and its extensive root system makes the plant extremely difficult to remove (Morgan et al., 2004). Similarly, it has completely dominated the groundcover layer along one area of the Mount 'Alava trail in the National Park of American Samoa, seemingly to the exclusion of all other species and has a tendency to climb and cover the trunks of most of the mature trees in the area (Space & Flynn, 2002). S. podophyllum may cause mild to severe poisoning if ingested (IFAS, 2009).



         Location Specific Impacts:
    American Samoa English 
    Competition: Syngonium podophyllum has completely dominated the groundcover layer along one area of the Mount 'Alava trail, seemingly to the exclusion of all other species. It also has a tendency to climb and cover the trunks of most of the mature trees in the area (Space & Flynn, 2002).
    Florida (USA) (United States (USA)) English 
    Competition: Syngonium podophyllum is an abundant category I invasive and is known to establish dense populations that crowd out surrounding vegetation (Ferriter et al., 2001; Morgan & Overholt, 2005). S. podophyllum threaten native ferns of Florida as their runners can overtake fern habitats (Possley, 2004). In several areas of St. Lucie and Indian River counties, S. podophyllum has created a thick ground cover that is largely impenetrable to other plants, and its extensive root system makes the plant extremely difficult to remove (Morgan et al., 2004).



ISSG Landcare Research NBII IUCN University of Auckland