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   Pinus pinaster (tree)  français     
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      Pinus pinaster (Photo: Forest & Kim Starr (USGS)) - Click for full size   Pinus pinaster (Photo: Forest & Kim Starr (USGS)) - Click for full size   A close up of Pinus pinaster bark (Photo: José Manuel Sánchez de Lorenzo Cáceres, Spain) - Click for full size   Pinus pinaster tree (Photo: José Manuel Sánchez de Lorenzo Cáceres, Spain) - Click for full size   Pinus pinaster cone (Photo: USGS-BRD Haleakala Field Station) - Click for full size   Pinus pinaster fruit (Photo: José Manuel Sánchez de Lorenzo Cáceres, Spain) - Click for full size
    Taxonomic name: Pinus pinaster Soland., non Ait.
    Synonyms: Pinus maritima, Pinus mesogeneensid
    Common names: cluster pine (English), maritime pine (English)
    Organism type: tree
    Pinus pinaster, originally from the Mediterranean Basin, has been planted in temperate regions within and outside its natural range for a wide range of reasons. It regenerates readily almost everywhere it is planted and in many places it invades natural shrubland, forest and grassland. Pinus pinaster forms dense thickets which supress native plants, changes fire regimes and hydrological properties and alters habitats for many animals.
    Description
    An evergreen coniferous tree, growing 20-35m tall, with 2 needle-shaped leaves per fascicle (leaves usually 15-20cm long and stiff). Cones 10-22cm long.
    Occurs in:
    agricultural areas, coastland, natural forests, planted forests, range/grasslands, riparian zones, ruderal/disturbed, scrub/shrublands, urban areas
    General impacts
    This species regenerates profusely after fire, often resulting in dense thickets of plants close to killed adult plants. These dense thickets supress native plants, change fire regimes and hydrological properties and alter habitats for many animals.
    Local dispersal methods
    Forestry (local):
    On animals (local):
    Management information
    Physical: Mechanical control is currently the most effective way of dealing with invasive Pinus pinaster stands. All plants are felled and allowed to lie for 12-18 months.
    Reproduction
    Pinus pinaster reproduces exclusively from seeds (it does not sprout). The small, winged seeds are held in serotinous cones. Some seeds are released every year, especially during hot spells when cones open partially. Trees have thin bark and a poor re
    This species has been nominated as among 100 of the "World's Worst" invaders
    Reviewed by: Dr. Dave Richardson, University of Capetown
    Compiled by: Dr. Dave Richardson, University of Capetown & IUCN/SSC Invasive Species Specialist Group (ISSG)
    Last Modified: Thursday, 16 June 2005


ISSG Landcare Research NBII IUCN University of Auckland