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   Bagaza Virus (BAGV) (micro-organism)
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         Interim profile, incomplete information
    Taxonomic name: Bagaza Virus (BAGV)
    Synonyms:
    Common names: BAGV
    Organism type: micro-organism
    The flavivirus, Bagaza virus (BAGV) was first isolated in Bagaza, Central African Republic, in 1966, from a pool of mixed-species female Culex spp. mosquitoes. It has subsequently been found in mosquitoes in other countries in western Africa and in India, where serologic evidence suggests that this virus may infect humans. In late 2010 an unusually high number of deaths of wild birds (partridges and phesants) in Cadiz in southwestern Spain was attributed to the Bagaza Virus through a detection study. The authors of the study suggest that- although there is no evidence, it is possible that infected birds migrating between Africa and Europe could have introduced the BAGV to Spain; other explanations put forth by the authors include possible introduction through the poultry industry or trading of exotic birds for commercial or hunting purposes.
    General impacts
    High number of red-legged partridges (Alectoris rufa) deaths were recorded on several hunting properties in southwestern Cádiz, Spain during late 2010. Some common pheasants (Phasianus colchicus) were also affected. Clinical signs included weakness, prostration, lack of motor coordination, weight loss, and white diarrhea (Aguero et al 2010).
    Geographical range
    Bagaza virus (BAGV) was first isolated in Bagaza, Central African Republic, in 1966, from a pool of mixed-species female Culex spp. mosquitoes. It has subsequently been found in mosquitoes in other countries in western Africa and in India (Aguero et al 2010; Bondre et al 2009). Detected in Mauritania and Senegal (Traore-Lamizana et al 1994, 2001). Detected in late 2010 in Cadiz in southwestern Spain (Aguero et al 2010).
    Introduction pathways to new locations
    Live food trade:
    Other: It is possible that infected birds migrating between Africa and Europe could have introduced the BAGV to Spain (Aguero et al 2010)
    Pet/aquarium trade:
    Management information
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    Compiled by: IUCN SSC Invasive Species Specialist Group
    Last Modified: Friday, 5 August 2011


ISSG Landcare Research NBII IUCN University of Auckland