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   Felis catus (mammal)
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    Details of this species in United Kingdom (UK)
    Status: Alien
    Invasiveness: Invasive
    Occurrence: Established
    Source: Woods, McDonald and Harris 2003
    Arrival Date:
    Introduction:
    Species Notes for this Location:
    Domestic cats are the most abundant carnivores in Great Britain and their numbers appear to be growing. In 1981, the national population of cats was estimated to be 6 million (UFAW 1981, in Woods, McDonald and Harris 2003). In 1993, the Cats Protection League estimated that approximately 25% of British households owned at least one cat and that the national population was approximately 7.6 million. This was predicted to increase to 8 million by 2000 (Cats Protection League 1993, in Woods, McDonald and Harris 2003). A more recent estimate supported this predicted increase and estimated that there were 7.8 million cats in 1998 (Turner and Bateson 2000, in Woods, McDonald and Harris 2003). In addition, a minimum of 813 000 cats are estimated to live in a feral or semi-wild state (mainly in rural areas) and a further unknown number of cats have only loose associations with domestic households in urban areas (Harris et al. 1995, in Woods, McDonald and Harris 2003). It therefore seems likely that the total cat population in Britain in 2003 is in the region of 9 million. By comparison to native carnivores, this is nearly 20 times the estimated pre-breeding populations of stoats and weasels and 38 times the estimated pre-breeding population of foxes (Vulpes vulpes) (Harris et al. 1995, in Woods, McDonald and Harris 2003).
    Management Notes for this Location:
    A questionnaire survey of the numbers of animals brought home by domestic cats (Felis catus) was conducted between 1 April and 31 August 1997. The number of birds and herpetofauna brought home per cat was significantly lower in households that provided food for birds. The number of bird species brought home was greater in households providing bird food. The number of birds and herpetofauna brought home per cat was negatively related to the age and condition of the cat. The number of mammals brought home per cat was significantly lower when cats were equipped with bells and when they were kept indoors at night. The number of herpetofauna brought home was significantly greater when cats were kept in at night.
    Location Notes:
    Last Modified: 24/07/2006 3:28:45 p.m.


ISSG Landcare Research NBII IUCN University of Auckland