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   Livistona chinensis (palm)
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   Interim profile, incomplete information

    Details of this species in Bermuda
    Status: Alien
    Invasiveness: Invasive
    Occurrence: Established
    Source: Department of Conservation Services, Government of Bermuda 2009
    Arrival Date:
    Introduction: Intentional
    Species Notes for this Location:
    The Chinese fan palm was introduced as an ornamental tree for gardens. Fan palms are naturalised in Bermuda and thickets of palms can be found along roadsides. The berries produced by the palms fall to the ground around the base of the tree and germinate. Seedlings grow to eventually form thickets. These thickets can crowd out and overshadow native species. Chinese fan palms are similar to and are often mistaken for the endemic Bermuda palmetto (Sabal bermudana).
    Management Notes for this Location:
    The Department of Conservation Services, Government of Bermuda suggests the following options for the control and management of the Chinese fan palm. Fan palms have thorns so gloves need to be used, young seedlings can be pulled out easily but not larger saplings. Re-growth can occur if it breaks and bits are left in the ground. Mature palms can be removed using a machete or bow saw. As the trunk is fibrous the chainsaw can get clogged frequently while working it. The centre of the stump needs to be destroyed. The herbicide 'Roundup’ can be used to brush the stump to prevent re-growth.

    The following characteristics can be used to distinguish the Chinese fan palm from the endemic Bermuda palmetto. Fan palms have thorns and the Bermuda palmetto do not. The fan palm has a uniformly green leaf, hard oval grey-blue berries and the leaf meets the stem in a 'C' shape when viewed from above, in the case of the palmetto, the berries are round and green and the leaf meets the stem in a 'V'. Juvenile of the species are difficult to distinguish from each other, the parent nearby will provide the clue. The Department of Conservation Services has issues a poster to distinguish the introduced Chinese fan palm from the endemic Bermuda palmetto (Department of Conservation Services, Government of Bermuda 2009).

    Location Notes:
    Last Modified: 4/10/2010 2:33:30 p.m.


ISSG Landcare Research NBII IUCN University of Auckland