Global Invasive Species Database 100 of the worst Donations home
Standard Search Standard Search Taxonomic Search   Index Search

   Rattus norvegicus mammal
Ecology Distribution Management
Info
Impact
Info
References
and Links
Contacts

    Rattus exulans
    kiore (Maori), Kleine Pazifikratte (German), Maori rat (English), Pacific rat (English), Polynesian rat (English), rat du Pacifique (French), rat Polynésien (French), tikus Polynesia (Indonesia)

    Rattus exulans (Photo: Mere Roberts, Auckland University) - Click for full size Rattus exulans (Photo: Mere Roberts, Auckland University) - Click for full size Rattus exulans (Photo: Mere Roberts, Auckland University) - Click for full size Rattus exulans (Photo: N.Z. Department of Conservation) - Click for full size

    Rattus exulans has less than one third the maximum body weight of Rattus norvegicus (130g compared to 450g), and it has a much shorter maximum head-body length (excluding tail) than Rattus norvegicus (180mm compared to 275mm). Its tail length is approximately the same as its head-body length and it has 8 nipples compared to the Norway rat’s 12. Droppings left by Rattus exulans are half as long (6.4-9.0 mm) as the Norway rat’s (13.4-19.1 mm). Rattus exulans is an agile climber. It is not known to burrow but digs small holes and nests mainly on the ground. It feeds on the ground and in trees and is an infrequent swimmer. Rattus norvegicus burrows extensively, nests underground and is a strong swimmer. It climbs much less frequently than other rats and is very wary (Cunningham and Moors, 1993).
    Rattus rattus
    black rat (English), blue rat (English), bush rat (English), European house rat (English), Hausratte (German), roof rat (English), ship rat (English)

    Rat approaching Rhipidura fuliginosa (NZ fantail) nest (Photo: David Mudge) - Click for full size Rattus rattus on Chatham Island (Photo: Rex Williams, Chatham Island Taiko Trust) - Click for full size Rat attacking NZ fantail (Photo: David Mudge) - Click for full size Rat approaching NZ fantail/Piwakawaka nest (Photo: David Mudge) - Click for full size

    Rattus rattus is lighter and has a shorter maximum head-body length (excluding tail) than Rattus norvegicus. Its tail is much longer than its head-body length and is uniformly coloured. The Norway rat’s tail is clearly shorter than its head-body length, and it has a pale underside. The upper side of the hind foot of Rattus rattus is usually dark, whereas it is always completely pale in the Norway rat. Droppings left by Rattus rattus are almost half as long (6.8-13.8 mm) as the Norway rat’s (13.4-19.1 mm). Rattus rattus is a very agile and frequent climber; rarely burrows, nests mainly in trees and shrubs and is an infrequent swimmer. Rattus norvegicus burrows extensively, nests underground and is a strong swimmer. It climbs much less frequently than other rats and is very wary (see Cunningham and Moors, 1993).

    Yuan et al. discuss the potential of image analysis methodologies in differentiating between the tracks of different rat species.


ISSG Landcare Research NBII IUCN University of Auckland